• André Lanskoy (31 March 1902 – 24 August 1976) was a Russian painter and printmaker who worked in France. He is associated with the School of Paris and Tachisme, an abstract painting movement that began during the 1940s.

    He was born in Moscow. After 1905, the family moved to St. Petersburg, the capital in 1909. In 1918, he moved to Kiev where he painted his first paintings. During the Russian Civil War he fought in the White Army. After an injury he moved to Constantinople and in 1921, he went to Paris. Recalling his arrival in the French capital, Lanskoy said: “Literally in the first night I started to paint and I haven’t stopped since.” In Paris, he met Serge Poliakoff, Jean-Michel Coulon and later Nicolas de Staël.

    Lanskoy spent a lot of time at museums and was influenced by James Ensor’s and Vincent van Gogh’s use of color. In 1923, he participated in his first group exhibitions of Russian painters at the La Licorne Gallery in Paris. Wilhelm Uhde discovered Lanskoy’s paintings at the Salon d’Automne in 1924 and became a collector of his works in the years that followed. In 1925, Lanskoy had a solo exhibition and his works were acquired by museums and important private collectors. After 1937, his paintings began a transition towards abstraction and he studied both Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky.